The Learned Pig

The Learned Pig

Launched in November 2013, The Learned Pig is an online arts magazine with a love for plants and animals. Our thinking has grown out of our engagement with landscape aesthetics and environmental ethics and these days we try to bring together multiple perspectives on bodies and places, interspecies interactions, and alternative conceptions of that which has rather too frequently been defined as “nature” or “the animal”.

Sing the Gloaming

An interview with Professor Simon Kirby and artist/ musicians Tommy Perman and Rob St. John discussing their ongoing collaborative project, Sing the Gloaming.

Spoiled Waters Spilled

Previewing an exhibition exploring rivers, contamination and cross-border circulation. Part of Manifesta 13 Les Parallèles du Sud.

Artist-in-Residence: Rosa Farber

Welcome to The Learned Pig’s inaugural artist residency! This residency is in part the result of ongoing discussions among our editorial team. We’ve been trying to think through ways to…

Songs We Learn from Trees

Chris Beckett and Alemu Tebeje give the lowdown on the Amharic poetry of Ethiopia. Then poetry by Solomon Deressa, Gebre Kristos Desta and Liyou Libsekal.

Observation Journal

In WWII, Nazis and Soviets fought for control over a seed collection. Now, artist Sergey Kishchenko plants fields to reconstruct these forgotten histories.

The Hockey Stick Poster Child

The Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow, and Landscape Research — Wald, Schnee und Landschaft (WSL) in German — sits on top of a hill in Birmensdorf, just outside Zurich….

Tania Kovats

Drawing Water

Now when I was a little chap I had a passion for maps. I would look for hours at South America, or Africa, or Australia, and lose myself in all…

Recollecting Landscapes

Rephotography, Memory and Transformation 1904-1980-2004-2014 Recollecting Landscapes documents over a century of landscape transformation in Flanders. The first step of the project dates from the early twentieth century, when Jean…

Cereal

Once, more than 10,000 years ago, Triticum – cereal – was a wild-growing genus with many varieties. Due to their nutritious grains, some of these varieties were cultivated by humans….